“Imagining our New Normal?”

“Behold I make all things new!” – Revelation 21:5

Twenty years ago my life changed forever in an instant when I flew over the handlebars of my bicycle and landed on my head. Like Humpty Dumpty I “couldn’t be put back together again.” The name for my new situation is traumatic brain injury (TBI), the injury so many of our troops return with from war.

Everyone’s TBI is different. In the Brain Injury community, we say, “If you’ve seen one TBI you’ve seen one TBI.”  Still, all TBIs share the family traits of neurological deficits and behavioral changes that are challenging for both the one who has them and for the loved ones who must deal with them.

As I was trying to stay afloat in these new uncharted waters, my thoughtful neuropsychologist, Sarah, threw me a lifeline with the term “new normal.” She said, “Don’t compare how you are today with how you were before the accident. Compare how you are today with how you were after the accident.  That’s your new normal.”

One of my disabilities is an impaired “executive function,” the part of the brain that allows one to multi-task. Sarah told me, “Before your accident you could probably cook dinner, talk to your wife, and listen to NPR all at the same time. Now pick one.” So I have learned how to do one thing at a time. Sometimes I get very frustrated by this, especially if I compare myself to before my injury, but measured by my new normal, I can see improvement.

This idea of new normal has been so helpful to me that I have begun to think about it as a metaphor for the life of faith. Since my injury I have been paying attention to the word “new” wherever I come across it in our faith.  Scripture is full of it: the Revelation passage above is just one of countless verses where “God is doing a new thing.”

And our hymnody is also full of allusions to the new: “morning by morning new mercies I see” and “new every morning is the love.”  These phrases carry so much emotional power for me.

They remind me that ours is a God of new starts, second chances, the God who raised Jesus from the dead. And you don’t have to have a disability to benefit from thinking about your “new normal.” The everyday bumps and shocks of life set us all back at times, and the aging process will in time diminish our capabilities. But this God of the new is never done with us, even in the face of death.

It occurs to me that “new normal” is a useful way to think about what happens after the pandemic. Many are eager to go “back to normal.” But there is no going back to the status quo ante.

Recall when the prophets like Jeremiah spoke of “restoring the fortunes” of Israel it didn’t mean going back to the way it was. It meant creating something new, something better, something more just, and fair and kind. It meant seeking something closer to God’s intention for his people and world

The upheavals in our society, the protests against police brutality, the cries for justice, and the revealing of the inequalities and inequities in our society call for more than a return to the way things were. The twin viruses of Covid-19 and racism share a trait: they are powerless without a host. These viruses invite us to imagine not a return to business as usual, but to a new way to be a society, a new way to be church, a new way to be a person of faith.

Let us imagine what our “new normal” might look like.

Prayer

God of the Exodus and the Resurrection help us to see and know the new things you are doing in us and in the world around us. Keep us from discouragement about the things we can longer do, and let us be grateful for the things we can. Open our imaginations to what new things we might do.

(Photo: RL Floyd, 2020)

2 thoughts on ““Imagining our New Normal?”

  1. Richard, as usual your sermons always seem to come just at the right time for me. I hope all is well with you and your family and friends. Your prayer resonated with me. It is where I live as well right now. “Keep us from discouragement about the things we can longer do, and let us be grateful for the things we can. Open our imaginations to what new things we might do.” I am dealing with discouragement on various levels. Getting old. The body just saying no and breaking down. I feel like time is of the essence and I am wondering, “what next oh living God?” My kids are late twenties, my daughter a single mom with my 4 year old grandson. They aren’t on their feet yet and I am getting tired. Just feel like call it a day and sitting out on my friend’s farm. But also feel like my kids aren’t ready to have me far away. My daughter talks about getting a two-family house one day, which I think would be great. My grandson and I adore each other. What next oh living God, oh loving God. Your will be done. Make me new. But that is the tricky part, His/Her will be done. Peace. Be well.

  2. Thanks for the good words. I’ve been sheltering in place with two of my young grandchildren and their parents since the middle of March. It is not easy. My 71 year old body isn’t getting any younger. But my grandchildren both tire and inspire me. God’s “steadfast love” envelopes us all. Walt Brueggemann translates “hesed” as “persistent solidarity” with humankind. You can count on it. In life and in death.

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